NOW Presses Amazon to Act Against Deceptive Dietary Supplement Sellers


NOW continues to press Amazon to act against sellers of dietary supplements seeking to trick consumers into thinking their products are quality, the company stated.

In the latest tactic, NOW said it spotted a brand posting certificates of analysis from a third-party testing lab on their website confirming fill weight. Not identity, potency or purity–just that the weight of the capsule meets specifications, according to NOW. A document like this is misleading to the average consumer who is unlikely to know that weight has nothing to do with identity, potency or purity, the hallmarks of quality, NOW stated.

“I think many of us had hoped that Amazon would institute safeguards that would marginalize companies engaging in this type of behavior,” said Dan Richard, NOW’s vice president of Global Sales and Marketing. “My wish is for Amazon to be very specific in their documentation requirements, be fully transparent with their rules and enforce them for all brands selling on their platform.”

NOW has previously released reports proving serious quality failings in lesser-known supplement brands purchased on Amazon. Since then, Amazon has instituted stronger requirements for dietary supplement sellers, but this C of A trick is yet more evidence that those brands are just finding other ways to mislead consumers, according to NOW.

NOW has shared this information with Amazon directly.

For more information, visit www.nowfoods.com.

NOW continues to press Amazon to act against sellers of dietary supplements seeking to trick consumers into thinking their products are quality, the company stated.

In the latest tactic, NOW said it spotted a brand posting certificates of analysis from a third-party testing lab on their website confirming fill weight. Not identity, potency or purity–just that the weight of the capsule meets specifications, according to NOW. A document like this is misleading to the average consumer who is unlikely to know that weight has nothing to do with identity, potency or purity, the hallmarks of quality, NOW stated.

“I think many of us had hoped that Amazon would institute safeguards that would marginalize companies engaging in this type of behavior,” said Dan Richard, NOW’s vice president of Global Sales and Marketing. “My wish is for Amazon to be very specific in their documentation requirements, be fully transparent with their rules and enforce them for all brands selling on their platform.”

NOW has previously released reports proving serious quality failings in lesser-known supplement brands purchased on Amazon. Since then, Amazon has instituted stronger requirements for dietary supplement sellers, but this C of A trick is yet more evidence that those brands are just finding other ways to mislead consumers, according to NOW.

NOW has shared this information with Amazon directly.





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